“Discover the Old Villas of Palanga”

The route “Discover the Old Villas of Palanga” will take you on a journey over 100 years in history. This route connects 27 historical villas of the resort in the period between the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century and other significant objects representing the architecture of the resort. In the streets of Palanga, you will find unique wooden and brick buildings that comprise the valuable architectural and cultural heritage of Palanga. Historical architecture enriches, as well as represents, the landscape of Palanga, the preservation of which enables the visitor to witness the development of the resort from the end of the 19th century till today. This route can be enjoyed regardless of weather or time of day. Shall we take the trip?

Additional information

VILLAS IN PALANGA
  1. Villa “Baltasis angelas” (“The White Angel”), Vytauto g. 78
  2. Villa “Šilelis” (“The Pinewood”), Grafų Tiškevičių al. 7
  3. Palangos senoji vaistinė (The Old Pharmacy of Palanga), Vytauto g. 33
  4. Villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”), Vytauto g. 54
  5. Dr. Jono Šliūpo memorialinė sodyba (Dr. Jonas Šliūpas Memorial Homestead), Vytauto g. 23A
  6. Villa “Pelėda” (“The Owl”), Birutės al. 51
  7. Antano Mončio namai-muziejus (Antanas Mončys House-Museum), S. Daukanto g. 16
  8. Villa, Kęstučio g. 19
  9. Šiltųjų maudyklių pastatas (Building of Warm Baths), Kęstučio g. 31
  10. Lietuvos karininkų ramovės vila (Lithuanian Garrison Officers Club Villa), Birutės al. 46
  11. Medžiotojų namas (Hunter’s House), J. Simpsono g. 19
  12. Villa, Gedimino g. 6
  13. Buršteino vila (Buršteinas’ villa), Birutės al. 37
  14. Villa “Mahorta”, Birutės al. 35
  15. Villa “Baltoji” (“The White”), Birutės al. 33
  16. Villas “Romeo” and “Džiuljeta”, Birutės al. 34, 36
  17. Villa “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”), Birutės al. 34A
  18. Villa “Jūrapilis”/“Komoda”) (“Sea Castle”/“Chest of Drawers”), Meilės al. 5
  19. Antano Žmuidzinavičiaus namas (Antanas Žmuidzinavičius House), J. Basanavičiaus g. 42
  20. Villa “Gintaras” (“Amber”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 37
  21. Villa, J. Basanavičiaus g. 35
  22. Villa “Jūros akis” (“The Sea Eye”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 33 / Birutės al. 32
  23. Fachverkinių vilų kompleksas (Complex of Fachwerk Villas), J. Basanavičiaus g. 26, 28, 30, 32, 34
  24. Villa “Aldona”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 24A
  25. Villa “Pajauta”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 22
  26. Villa “Vilija”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 20
  27. Villa “Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 21
1. Villa “Baltasis angelas” (“The White Angel”), Vytauto g. 78

This is one of the oldest buildings in Palanga. The villa “Baltasis angelas” (“The White Angel”) was built around 1870 by Counts Tiškevičiai as a summer residence. Around 1936, the building was bought by M. Urniežius from the Bacevičiai family. A sculpture of a white angel used to stand in front of the villa, but has since been transferred to the grave of Urniežiai family in Palanga town cemetery. In 2005, the building was granted the status of immovable cultural heritage property of regional importance.

2. Villa “Šilelis” (“The Pinewood”), Grafų Tiškevičių al. 7

Vadimas Lvovas, the first architect of Palanga, succeeded in laying the foundation for a modern resort. He re-designed and revived the resort, which at that point was destroyed in the fire of 1938. The architect also implemented dozens of his own projects. In 1939, in the old part of the town, the architect V. Lvovas designed the villa “Šilelis” (“The Pinewood”), strictly following a clean form design. The building reflects the dominant architectural style of 1940s Lithuania. Villa “Šilelis” (“The Pinewood”) is a private building and offers accommodation services.

3. Palangos senoji vaistinė (The Old Pharmacy of Palanga), Vytauto g. 33

The history of this impressive wooden building began in 1827, when a German from Riga, Vilhelmas Johanas Griuningas, opened one of the oldest pharmacies in Lithuania. The founder of the pharmacy patented the production of an extract made of 27 herbs “Trejos devynerios” (“Triple Nines”). The owners of the pharmacy in Palanga, father and son Griuningas, were known for their loyalty to Lithuania during Lithuanian press ban period: their prescriptions and medicine labels were printed in Lithuanian.

In 1910, the pharmacy was bought by German provisor Vilhelmas Bertingas. In 1923, his son Oskaras Aleksandras Bertingas inherited the pharmacy. In 1937, the pharmacy belonged to the successors of O. A. Bertingas. Around 1938, the pharmacy building was rented to Zigmas Bagdonavičius. During 1940–1944, a library was opened in the hall of the northern wing. In 1944–1951, the building was used for other purposes, namely, as the headquarters of the People’s Commissariat for Internal Affairs (NKVD). This historical fact is memorialized on a board on a stone pillar on the right side of the main wing of the building. In 1988, in the yard of the pharmacy, a cross for exiles was built by Albertas Žulkus. The ownership status of the building was changed during the post-war period; it became a state enterprise.

Following the reconstructions from 1950s to 1980s, the pharmacy was set up in the southern part of the house, as well. In 1992, the building received the status of immovable cultural heritage property of regional importance. Currently, the building is used according to its primary, historical commercial and residential (southern part of the house) purpose of use.

4. Villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”), Vytauto g. 54

The villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”) was built in 1926 and was known as a place of gathering of Lithuanian cultural activists during the interwar period. During the Soviet times, the villa was nationalized and used as a recreation house for the Ministry of Finance. Today, descendants of the first owners of the villa G. and S. Darginavičiai are in charge, and the building is used according to its primary function, the cosy cultural environment was revived.

The artistic style and forms of villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”) represent Lithuanian resort architecture and blend into the context of the wooden architecture of Palanga. The wooden villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”) is a typical recreational building of the first half of the 20th century: a restaurant on the first floor, the upper floors divided into rooms with balconies to accommodate vacationers.

Near the villa “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”), on the other side of the street, the cultural centre “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”) (Vytauto g. 35) is located. Concerts, plays, literature events, books presentations are held in the cultural centre all year round. Another cultural space that is located near the villa – the art gallery “Ramybė” (“Tranquillity”) (Vytauto g. 35). This is one of the most active galleries in Palanga that is also open all the year round. The gallery consists of chamber halls for exhibitions, international art residency and creative workshops.

 

5. Dr. Jono Šliūpo memorialinė sodyba (Dr. Jonas Šliūpas Memorial Homestead), Vytauto g. 23A

The history of this building begins at the end of the 19th century. It is believed that the house was built by Counts Tiškevičiai, who had great influence on the development of the infrastructure of Palanga resort.

In 1933, city rights were granted to Palanga, and Dr. Jonas Šliūpas became the burgomaster. J. Šliūpas, whose term lasted from 1933 till 1941 with breaks, settled down in Palanga in 1929. He was lured to this town by a charming Palanga resident, who later became his wife, Grasilda Grauslytė. He took up residence in a wooden one-storey house located on Vytauto Street. The most beautiful part of the house is the main south-eastern façade with moulding, decorated with openwork ornaments, balcony fence and profiled window rims with openwork transom motifs and diamond-shaped windows in the attic. The mezzanine is incorporated into the façade, as well as a glass veranda and a balcony above.

In 1989, an exposition was held to introduce key facts about the life and work of J. Šliūpas, presenting photographs reflecting the most significant moments in his political career. The interior of J. Šliūpas’ workroom and living room of the house were recreated in the style of a Lithuanian intellectual. Another part of the exposition was dedicated to the history of the Lithuanian national movement, Lithuanian press and Palanga city at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Dr. Jonas Šliūpas Memorial Homestead is a division of the National Museum of Lithuania. In 1993, the building was granted the status of immovable cultural heritage property of regional importance.

Jonas Šliūpas was a Lithuanian national movement activist, physician, active promoter of independent Lithuania in the political strata of USA, publicist. He was born on 6 March, 1861, in Rakandžiai village, Gruzdžiai rural district, Šiauliai County. During World War I, J. Šliūpas’ activity dedicated to Lithuania became a diplomatic fight for Lithuania’s freedom. With the impending second Soviet occupation, together with his family, J. Šliūpas left for Austria in 1944. He died on 6 November in 1944 in Berlin and was buried in Chicago, in the Lithuanian National Cemetery.

6. Villa “Pelėda” (“Owl”), Birutės al. 51

The villa “Pelėda” (“Owl’) reflects the spread of modernism in wooden resort architecture. In 1939, the building was built in a newly acquired plot by banker Buršteinas. 10 rooms were set up in the building connected by a corridor system, which has been preserved. The symmetrical façade of the building, consisting of a plane in the centre with side parts, which are pulled back to add some variety to the volume of the building, is connected by massive balconies on the second floor. The space underneath them houses the main entrances to the building and terraces with a row of windows. In 1997, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

7. Antano Mončio namai-muziejus (Antanas Mončys House-Museum), S. Daukanto g. 16

The building of Antanas Mončys Museum was built by Vladas Navickas, the son of a land foreman for Count Tiškevičius, at the end of the 20th century.

Unlike most memorial houses-museums, A. Mončys House does not have direct links to the artist himself. Antanas Mončys (1921–1993) was a Lithuanian sculptor modernist who moved to the West during World War II. Even though A. Mončys never lived in Palanga, the sculptor, who grew up in neighbouring Kretinga district in Mončiai, always admired the resort. Before his death, the artist donated a large portion of his works to Lithuania, including sculptures that were exhibited in the library building of the previous “Jūratė” sanatorium. In 1999, A. Mončys House-Museum was opened. The reconstruction of the building was overseen by architect Petras Lapė. In 2010, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Local Significance.

To convert the building into a museum, exhibition spaces were installed, stylized fragments of the author’s works were used in the exterior: rather than using traditional horse-shaped roof decorations, the main façade was adorned with the elements from illustrations created by A. Mončys for Lithuanian fairy tales by Oskaras Milašius; the stair handle was transformed into a whistle created by the sculptor. Website: www.antanasmoncys.com. A unique Palanga Fairy Tale Park was opened in 2016 near A. Mončys House-Museum.

8. Villa, Kęstučio g. 19

One-storey villa with an attic was built at the beginning of the 20th century. This example of wooden resort architecture is known as a marriage registration place by Palanga residents and visitors (Civil Registry Office of Palanga City Municipality is located in the building). In 1993, the villa was granted the status of State-Protected Object of Regional Importance: the nature of valuable properties of the building resulting in the significance of the building was named as architectural.

9. Šiltųjų maudyklių pastatas (Building of Warm Baths), Kęstučio g. 31

Warm baths have a unique place in the history of the development of Palanga resort. In 1888–1900, upon assessing the healing properties of Palanga resort, Count Feliksas Tiškevičius built a wooden building of warm baths in the style of Swiss villas. Warm sea water, mineral and herb baths and various treatment procedures were offered in the building.

Due to a growing interest and number of holidaymakers, the building was reconstructed several times. In 1910–1912, two wings (eastern and western) were added. Following the reconstruction, 26 bathtubs were installed: 6 – first-class, 14 – second-class and 4 – third-class baths. After the repairs in 1929, 25 bathtubs were in use. The Building of Warm Baths was nationalized after World War II, and the balneological (water–mud) treatment facility was opened in 1952.

In 2004, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

10. Lietuvos karininkų ramovės vila (Lithuanian Garrison Officers Club Villa), Birutės al. 46

In 1934, Lithuanian garrison officers (from 1924 – Lietuvos kariuomenės karininkų ir karo valdininkų klubas (Lithuanian Army Officers and War Officials’ Club)) bought a wooden, two-storey villa on the intersection of Birutės avenue and J. Simpsono Street. The villa was called “Ramovė” (“Romuva”). In 1935, building repairs started.

On 31 December, 1940, the villa and the land plots belonging to it along with the property were surrendered to the Soviet army. In 1945–1993, the villa belonged to various departments: rest house “Neringa”, the Board of the Ministers’ Council Affairs, sanatorium “Jūratė”. On 2 February, 1993, the building along with the land was transferred to the Ministry of Defence. On 15 June, 1995, by the Order of the Minister of Defence, Palanga Garrison Officers Club was established. In 2001, it was handed over to Lithuanian Armed Forces and became a division thereof. In 2013, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Regional Importance.

Today, events and conferences organized by the defence system and Lithuanian Armed Forces are held in the villa, it also accommodates servicemen participating in training. As in the pre-war period, defence system soldiers, civil servants and employees, as well as their family members, can enjoy Lithuanian Garrison Officers Club Villa as a location for recreation. Many soldiers returning from missions come to the villa to improve their health and working capacity.

11. Medžiotojų namas (Hunter’s House), J. Simpsono g. 19

The building was constructed at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century as a hunting house for baron Ungem von Sternberg. The building belonged to the family of the baron till 1938. Later, G. Milašius purchased the plot together with a portion of the plot. The new owner reconstructed the building; up to then, the house did not have verandas and was with a red-tile roof. In 1939, the owner of the building installed verandas on three sides and decorated them with wood carvings. The building was designed by the first Palanga city architect – V. Lvovas.

After World War II, garrison officers occupied the building. In 1957–1970, the house was used by the poet Antanas Venclova. Following the Restoration of Independence, the house was returned to the descendants of G. Milašius. In 2004, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Regional Importance.

12. Villa, Gedimino g. 6

The villa on Gedimino Street stands out with its expressive forms. Its architectural solution is similar to the classical manors of the 19th century. The veranda with the balcony above, which is supported by four columns, is the main accent of the two-storey building. A unique example of small architecture – an octagonal pavilion with a tapering tower – can be found in the yard.

13. Buršteino villa (Buršteinas’ villa), Birutės al. 37

Following World War I, many wealthy individuals were attracted to the possibility of acquiring the property of Counts Tiškevičiai up for sale, including bankers from Kaunas, Nilsonas and Tanchumas Buršteinai. In 1930s, they purchased a plot of 30 ares in Birutės avenue from Count Tiškevičius. In 1939, they built a wooden two-storey villa with a mansard roof.

In 1948, according to a long-term agreement, the villa was rented to Vilnius University for the purposes of employee recreational activities and was named “Romuva”. In 1997, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

14. Villa “Mahorta”, Birutės al. 35

In 1899–1900, a wooden villa “Mahorta” rose in Birutės avenue. The two-storey octagonal tower is the most significant accent of the villa. The building, which belonged to Countess Sofija Tiškevičienė before World War I, was later acquired by V. Kudirka.

During the inter-war period, a restaurant was opened in villa “Mahorta” and became a popular entertainment and leisure location of the resort. An orchestra used to play in the restaurant, concerts and dance evenings were organized. The villa was nationalized after World War II. In 1948, according to a long-term agreement, the villa was rented to Vilnius University for the purposes of employee recreational activities. In 1949, the villa underwent repairs. In 1973, the interior was reconstructed. In 1997, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

15. Villa “Baltoji” (“The White”), Birutės al. 33

The villa “Baltoji” (“The White”) was built in 1900–1914. It is one of few brick villas in the resort. After the death of Count Juozas Tiškevičius (1891), the building was inherited by his daughter, Marija Tiškevičiūtė.

From 1938, the villa belonged to attorney Vladas Stašinskas (1874–1944), a public figure and a statesman of the Republic of Lithuania. In 1930s, the first president of Lithuania Antanas Smetona and his family used to stay in the villa every year for four weeks during the season. Employees of the Presidential Palace used to come to Palanga together with the President. During the summer, this villa became the summer residence of the President of Lithuania.

During the inter-war period, this villa, located at the intersection of Birutės avenue and J. Basanavičiaus Street, was an exclusive location of Palanga resort. During the summer, most important politicians and cultural elites stayed here. During the Soviet times, the façades of the villa were severely damaged, the interior plan was changed. In 2006, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Regional Importance.

16. Villas “Romeo” and “Džiuljeta”, Birutės al. 34, 36

Romantic twin villas of Palanga resort – “Romeo” (on the left) and “Džiuljeta”. The villas were built in 1890–1905. From the beginning of the 20th century, the villas belonged to Countess Sofija Tiškevičienė and were rented out. Unfortunately, the perimeter balconies customary to other rest houses did not survive. During the season, they were a place for playful flirting, networking and meetings.

From the 1930s, the villas were repossessed by the Lithuanian Economy Bank (Lietuvos ūkio bankas). In 1937, a residential care home and sanatorium were established in the villas; later on, the rest house “Jūratė” was opened in the premises. The villas preserved their authentic appearance even though during the Soviet times, despite the outbuildings that were built near façades, and the balconies and terraces being demolished.

The villa complex “Romeo” and “Džiuljeta” located on Birutės avenue, along with other buildings belonging to the Counts, highlight the elegant historical period of the reign of Tiškevičiai and emphasize the beginning of modern recreational culture in Lithuania. In 1993, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

17. Villa “Jūrapilis”/“Komoda” (“Sea Castle”/“Chest of Drawers”), Meilės al. 5

The villa “Jūrapilis” (“Sea Castle”) or “Komoda” (“Chest of Drawers”) is one of the most significant and beautiful parts of the heritage of Counts Tiškevičiai in Palanga. The construction of the two-storey villa in the Italian Neo-Renaissance style with a terrace on the roof was commissioned by Count Feliksas Tiškevičius in 1895. The villa was built for Aleksandras Tiškevičius, the brother of F. Tiškevičius, and his family. It is believed that the villa was designed by Italian architect Leonard Marconi residing in Poland. L. Marconi designed an analogous villa in Monaco, similar villas were built in Poland. The architect and Counts Tiškevičiai were acquaintances – he also designed a manor in Trakų Vokė.

During World War I, the building was severely damaged by bullets. In 1930s–1940s, the villa was reconstructed. During the inter-war period, the two-storey brick villa with mansard belonged to the youth organization (ateitininkai).

In 2009, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania. Currently, the villa is being revived and will be used for accommodation services; a restaurant with a terrace on the roof will be opened as well.

18. Villa “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”), Birutės al. 34A

The villa “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”) was built in 1898. This is the most unique villa, without equals not only in the resort architecture of Palanga, but entire Lithuania.

At the beginning of its life, villa “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”) belonged to Countess Sofija Tiškevičienė, the mother of Palanga Count Feliksas Tiškevičius. Thus, for a long period, it was called “Sofija”.

Palanga legend says that the owner of the villa Sofija Tiškevičienė enjoyed communicating with spirits. Allegedly, she had a secret mirror room above the attic, and once summoned, the spirits were not able to escape and return to their world. It was also said that the spirits of Sofija and her maid, who hanged herself, haunted the villa. Local residents avoided the villa because of the sounds of a wind organ coming from the inside. The story goes that Countess Sofija Tiškevičienė was in poor health, and as soon as she felt ill, she would go to listen to the sounds of the wind organ, which helped calm her down.

After World War I, the villa was sold to the Lithuanian Economy Bank (Lietuvos ūkio bankas). During the inter-war period, the villa was known for its bohemian aura. It was visited by the President of the Republic of Lithuania Aleksandras Stulginskis and his wife, including famous Lithuanian culture, art, science or political figures (poet Maironis, priest Juozas Vailokaitis, painter Kipras Petrauskas, etc.).

During World War II, the building was nationalized and residential premises were set up. Later, the sanatorium club “Jūratė” was established in the villa. After Lithuania restored its independence, the building was transferred to Palanga Cultural Centre (1996). During the first years of the revival of “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”), the most famous musical club in the Lithuanian seaside settled in the villa. In 1992, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

In October 2010, during a conference organized by the Department of Culture of Palanga City Municipality Administration, a resolution was approved by which the establishment of Palanga Resort Museum in villa “Anapilis” (“The Otherworld”) was initiated. In 2013, the Council of Palanga City Municipality approved the establishment of Palanga Resort Museum. Museologists started working in the villa from 2014, and in 2016, Palanga Resort Museum was opened to the visitors. Palanga Resort Museum website address: www.kurortomuziejus.lt.

19. Antano Žmuidzinavičiaus namas (Antanas Žmuidzinavičius’ House), J. Basanavičiaus g. 42

Like many buildings in Palanga at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, the construction of the villa is linked to the Counts Tiškevičiai, the owners of Palanga. Lithuanian painter Antanas Žmuidzinavičius (1876–1966) spent his summers in this villa from 1940s till his death, after the Soviet government assigned the nationalized house to the artist.

The painter has created some 2 thousand works of various techniques, genres and topics. The axis of his creation – landscape painting characterized by a romantic, lyrical portrayal of landscape, realistic treatment of image, attempt to idealize and emphasize the natural beauty of the native land. A considerable part of A. Žmuidzinavičius works are landscapes of the Lithuanian seaside. Most of the painter’s works were born in this wooden villa. It is interesting that the mansard and workshop was designed by A. Žmuidzinavičius himself to satisfy his needs. In 1993, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

20. Villa “Gintaras” (“Amber”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 37

According to the data collected in 1934, the land plot of 14.68 ares was purchased by attorney Pranas Viktoras Raulinaitis. It is believed that he bought the land from Counts Tiškevičiai. In 1930s, P. V. Raulinaitis built a two-storey villa with mansard “Gintaras” (“Amber”). The building reflects the style of wooden resort villas of the 20th century.

During the Soviet times, the villa was nationalized. In the second half of the 20th century, a rest house was established in it. In 2014, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Local Significance. According to the data of the register, the architectural solution of the façade is one of the most significant values of the object. The primary, historical purpose of the building was residential, recreational use. Now, a coffee shop is open in the building during the summer season.

21. Villa, J. Basanavičiaus g. 35

The villa estimated to have been built in the 1930s. It has Swiss-style properties, best revealed through stylized planking of the mansard part of the side façade. During the inter-war period, the plot the building is located in changed several owners, and, during the Soviet times, after nationalization, the villa became a wing of the “Jūratė” recreation complex. In 2014, the building was recognized as Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Local Significance. Currently, accommodation services are being offered in the building.

22. Villa “Jūros akis” (“The Sea Eye”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 33/Birutės al. 32

The villa “Jūros akis” (“The Sea Eye”) is a masterpiece of resort architecture of 1897–1910 that belonged to S. Tiškevičienė. This Swiss-style villa has asymmetrical composition, all façades differ and the plan of the building is adapted for accommodation services. Following the reconstruction, a 52-seat coffee shop and three apartments furnished with luxurious antique furniture were set up on the first floor. Each room has a name: the first one is called “Jūros akis” (“The Sea Eye”), the second – “Grafas” (“Count”), and the third room is introduced to the guests as “Meilužė” (“Mistress”). Legend says that Count Tiškevičius’ mistress lived in this room.

In 1992, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania. During the summer season, accommodation and catering services are offered in the building.

23. Fachverkinių vilų kompleksas (Complex of Fachwerk Villas), J. Basanavičiaus g. 26, 28, 30, 32, 34

The complex of villas is characterized by Swiss-style elements fused with the construction traditions of Prussian fachwerk. The complex is considered to be one of the oldest in Palanga and reminds of times when aristocracy would come to Palanga at the invitation of Counts Tiškevičiai – their friends and relatives. The Complex of Fachwerk Villas consists of five buildings located in the western part of the territory between Ronžė River and J. Basanavičiaus g.

The largest and oldest villa of the complex is located at J. Basanavičiaus g. 28. It was built at the end of the 19th century by Count A. Tiškevičius and, later on, sold to his mother S. Tiškevičienė. The villa saw many owners: in 1929 – M. Bučmienė, in 1934 – priest J. Maksvičius, the brother of M. Bučmienė. In 1940, the villa was nationalized. In 1945–1975, residential apartments were set up. The one-storey villa with a mansard boasts horizontal volume and a rectangular plan. In 2002, the building was reconstructed, the interior planning was changed, and an open veranda and a terrace were installed from the side of the courtyard.

Other three smaller fachwerk villas are located in the northwest corner (J. Basanavičiaus g. 30, 32 and 34). A regular octagon-shaped pavilion consisting of a single room is located east of the small villas (J. Basanavičiaus g. 26). The villas were built at the beginning of the 20th century by the family members of Counts Tiškevičiai.

Currently, catering companies occupy the buildings. In 1997, the Complex of Fachwerk Villas was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania.

24. Villa “Aldona”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 24A

This is one of the most beautiful villas on J. Basanavičiaus Street in Palanga. The villa belonged to the family of Counts Tiškevičiai and, according to available information, was the main mansion – the palace (palocius).

In the second half of the 19th century, the villas were appropriated for summer vacationing. The one-storey villa “Aldona” was decorated with wood carvings and had spacious open gazebos and several mansards. Most of the villas built in Palanga at that time had small squares with paths; however, this villa contrasted with a wide well-planned drive-way.

At the end of 19th century, the villa was known by the name “Olga”, and only later was it renamed “Aldona”. This new name is surrounded by legends connected to the poem “Konradas Valenrodas” (“Konrad Wallenrod”) by Adomas Mickevičius. It is believed that the character of Aldona was created during Adomas Mickevičius’ summer visit in the emergent Palanga resort.

The villa “Aldona” is a state-protected building as a cultural heritage property. In 1997, it was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania. The unique architecture of the villa is of greatest value, but the planned spatial structure is also protected.

In 2017, a unique entertainment complex was opened in the villa – the House of Illusions “Eureka”. The visitors of the house have the opportunity not only to participate in the illusion, see and present themselves in a non-traditional environment and situations, but also to learn about the surrounding world. The house boasts a collection of exhibits made according to special order abroad that makes visitors doubt their own senses. Unique reality-shifting works by Lithuanian artists are also presented.

25. Villa “Pajauta”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 22

The villa “Pajauta” was built at the end of the 19th century. Its architectural solutions are similar to the Complex of Fachwerk Villas (J. Basanavičiaus g. 26, 28, 30, 32, 34). This villa is also of fachwerk construction and stands out with its architectural forms and classic décor elements. Since, according to available data, all other fachwerk buildings belonged to S. Tiškevičienė and her relatives, it is believed that this villa could have been owned by the Counts Tiškevičiai as well.

In 1993, the building was included in the Register of Immovable Cultural Heritage Properties of the Republic of Lithuania. Currently, the building is occupied by a catering company.

26. Villa “Vilija”, J. Basanavičiaus g. 20

Following World War I, the land was bought from the Counts Tiškevičiai by priest Liudvikas Kasperavičius for his sister Bronislava Knabikaitė-Zabulionienė. The villa “Dievaitis” (“Deity”), villa “Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”) (built in 1936), also called “Liliputas” (“Lilliputian”) due to its small size, as well as an outbuilding stood on the grounds.

“Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”) may be one of the smallest recreational buildings in Palanga during the inter-war period to be classified as a villa. Currently, the Exile and Resistance Museum has set up in the building. It offers information and an exposition about an important and tragic period in the history of Lithuania. The museum tells the story about a difficult but tenacious attempt to fight for independent Lithuania and maintain its spirit at the heart at any cost. In 2014, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Local Significance.

27. Villa “Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”), J. Basanavičiaus g. 21

Following World War I, the land was bought from the Counts Tiškevičiai by priest Liudvikas Kasperavičius for his sister Bronislava Knabikaitė-Zabulionienė. The villa “Dievaitis” (“Deity”), villa “Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”) (built in 1936), also called “Liliputas” (“Lilliputian”) due to its small size, as well as an outbuilding stood on the grounds.

“Vaidilutė” (“Priestess”) may be one of the smallest recreational buildings in Palanga during the inter-war period to be classified as a villa. Currently, the Exile and Resistance Museum has set up in the building. It offers information and an exposition about an important and tragic period in the history of Lithuania. The museum tells the story about a difficult but tenacious attempt to fight for independent Lithuania and maintain its spirit at the heart at any cost. In 2014, the building was granted the status of Immovable Cultural Heritage Property of Local Significance.

CREATIVE GROUP

Published by: Palanga tourism information center

Collected by: Mindaugas Surblys

Translated by: “Translittera”

Designed by: Gitana Dainiūtė

Photos by: Mindaugas Surblys, Palanga public library Local history fund, Palanga Resort Museum

Printed by: “Druka“

Puiki idėja
2018-08-28 Puikus išpildymas. Džiaugiuosi kartu su Jumis. :)